The best American destinations for pot tourists

With the legalization of marijuana in four US states (Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska) and the recreational use of it currently allowed in the first two, buying weed is becoming as normal an activity as, say, shopping at the Gap. Just ask Bethenny Frankel, who tweeted during a recent trip to Aspen:

(It’s also been rumored the RHONYC is planning a line of Skinnygirl marijuana that “won’t cause the munchies,” according to US Weekly.)

From touring a marijuana-growing operation in Seattle to purchasing pot-infused personal lubricant in Aspen, here are five ways to get your buzz on in these pot-friendly territories.

Marijuana tours of Seattle

“Cannabis is turning into something akin to the wine industry,” says Michael Gordon, CEO of Kush Tourism, a company that organizes marijuana tours and cannabis-related activities in Seattle. And a Kush excursion to Sky High Gardens is not unlike visiting a vineyard: You’ll see where and how the plants are grown and hear about all the nuances in smell and taste.

The only difference? Here, you can’t actually sample the product. Not to worry: “You always get the opportunity to buy at a retail outlet during the tour,” says Gordon. Kush also just launched a Toke ‘n’ Brush class, “which was a huge success,” Gordon says. “We provide vaporizers and the art supplies, you bring the pot.”

The site also points you to 4:20-friendly lodging in Washington, and its Rent-a-Vape program lets you rent a vaporizer by the day.

The first pot-enhanced lubricant for women

Cannabis has been used as an aphrodisiac for thousands of years, so it’s not surprising someone came up with the idea of a weed-based lube. Launching today during Aspen’s X Games, Foria, a sprayable blend of coconut oil and cannabis, promises its female users “deeper and more accessible orgasms, enhanced desire and full-body relaxation.”

Though each spritz contains a small dose of THC and the product is edible (as well as vegan and gluten-free), it’s meant to excite the lady-parts, rather than to get you high. Pleasure doesn’t come cheap: It’s $96 for a 30ml bottle, $48 for 10ml. Look for it soon on the shelves of Native Roots stores across the state.

Weed-friendly accommodations

While you can legally buy weed in Colorado, it’s not OK to smoke it in public. And hotels aren’t exactly enamored of guests lighting up on the balcony (most prohibit marijuana consumption on hotel premises and fines are hefty). So where do you go to enjoy your wares? Enter TravelTHC, a sort of Airbnb for stoners, which links owners of marijuana-friendly properties with tourists looking for a short-term rental. And just like Airbnb, TravelTHC vets both hosts and visitors.

If you’re not comfortable with staying in a stranger’s home, there are two “Bud+Breakfast” B&Bs that opened last year: the Adagio, located in a historic Victorian in downtown Denver, and in the mountains outside Vail, the Silverthorne, with four Grateful Dead-themed suites named after the band members. Both properties host a 4:20 Happy Hour for guests — those in the know will get the quirky timing — with hors d’oeuvres, beer, wine and a selection of three different strains of cannabis.

Cannabis spa treatments

Billing itself as “the world’s first cannabis day spa,” the Denver-area Primal Wellness Day Spa offers its Signature Cannabis Infusion, a custom blend of essential oils mixed with whole-plant cannabis, in facials and massages.

Also in Denver, LoDo Massage and Yoga is popular for its “Mile High Massage,” a deep-tissue massage that uses creams infused with THC and CBD (both from the marijuana plant). Don’t expect to get high during these treatments — the topicals mainly act as a therapeutic pain reliever. But you still have to be over 21 to indulge.

Cannabis conventions

Calling all nerdy stoners: Everything — absolutely everything — you’d ever want to know about weed (from cultivating it to branding it to setting up a legit pot business) you can discover at these two expos: CannaCon (Feb. 19-21) in Seattle, and the International Cannabis Business Conference (Feb. 15-16) in San Francisco.

The latter features top keynote speakers including best-selling travel author and PBS host Rick Steves — an advocate of reforming our nation’s marijuana laws.